What Your Words Say About You – Luscious Mother

What Your Words Say About You – Luscious Mother

Here at Luscious Mother headquarters, we’re hard at work on all the words going into our copy and content for the upcoming winter retreat from January 26 through 28, which is super exciting. How do we do it? My writer and I first talk about it, she gives me a first draft to review, then I work it out with Matt and we go from there. A few days ago, Matt and I were brainstorming about using “letting go of baggage” as a metaphor for the intro of the landing page (where people can register for the retreat). We thought about James Brown’s song Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag. Why not Mama? It’s a great song. A classic song. Now with our own twist. We got all excited about the bag thing and wrote it into the landing page copy. Well, my writer wasn’t having it. She took it all out and left a note saying: “I deleted the James Brown references because he abused women.” Until I read her note, I had no idea James Brown was a known domestic abuser of women. It was news to me. With the state of the world, the words we speak and the jokes and quips we allow become the fabric of who we are and how we treat people. If I say I’m an advocate for all women, then I need to be mindful of what (and who) I’m putting out there. This kind of mindfulness applies to our everyday thinking on other major issues: What we do and don’t support has deep consequences. With the horrific events in...
The Time(s) I Almost Quit Coaching

The Time(s) I Almost Quit Coaching

Boy, I had THE BEST time in Chicago: I lead my first Accomplishment Coaching training weekend. I wasn’t the #1 back up dancer. I was running the show with another leader. Large and in charge. This is what I’ve been working towards for the last three and a half years. And at times, I wanted to quit the whole shabang. Let me explain: I graduated three plus years ago from the AC Program. There was an opportunity to join the leadership team and be a mentor. Then there was a big opportunity to coach and train at the United Nations. My first year was great — relatively easy. And as I grew in my leadership — it got really hard. Training for a big job can be really confronting, especially in my work where when people call you out on your stuff. Often, ego and self-defense come into play. It’s a lot to deal with, and there were many times I wanted to quit. But, I had a few positive things on my side that kept me in the game: A coach who reminded me of my higher commitment to transforming lives. A supportive team to remind me of my greatness. A group of people who listened to me, always. Back to my Chicago trip: Saturday morning, I spoke to a group of 40ish people (participants, guests and mentor coaches) I didn’t know. I had to create credibility and relationships with people I’d never met in a city I’d never been in with a team I didn’t know. What happened: People saw things they hadn’t seen and valued my...