What to do when your kid’s being a sass bucket

Last week, I went to Disney World for the first time as a 40-year-old.  The experience was, well, very Disney: fun, expensive and, as it turned out, educational. You see, before we left for the Most Magical Place on Earth, Mirabelle’s snappiness meter had been tipping off the charts. There had been a lot of “Stop it, Mama!” and what I like to call a stinky attitude. I wasn’t about to shell out all that mad Disney World cash for a stinky attitude, that’s for sure. That’s when I shot up a flare to Wendy Petricoff of Charlotte Parenting Solutions. She’s a wiz at getting the stink out of kids and parents, like those moms that get grass stains out of white shirts in Tide commercials. Wendy and I had a call on Friday at 9:30 a.m. while I was in Disney World proper, and here’s the clarity she brought me on our call: It’s so powerful to be heard and gotten: Wendy listened and empathized with my plight, and she got real with me. She talked about a recent moment with her teenage daughter at Nordstrom over a $30 skirt, impressing on me that the sass never ends, and these clashes are very human. My child’s sass can be an asset to her later in life. It’s not always such a bad thing when our daughters are sassy. When they grow up and need to set boundaries about their bodies and time, you want them to sass away. It can be valuable to have a sharp, sassy daughter. Practicing empathy and non-reaction wins the day. These two are a potent combo against sass....